Monthly Archives: October 2016

Sita’s Ramayana

Sita’s Ramayana is a stunning retelling of the original Ramayana in the form of a graphic novel, with Sita (the abducted princess at the heart of the story) telling the tale from her viewpoint–imagine the Trojan War, told by Helen. … Continue reading

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Ramayana: Divine Loophole

Sanjay Patel’s artwork for the Ramayana is so amazing, it’s hard for a blog post to do justice, hence the slideshow below. A faithful, if necessarily abbreviated  retelling of the epic, the stylised art of this ex-Pixar animator is stunning and will draw in … Continue reading

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Maya

Maya, by Mahak Jain and illustrated by Elly Mackay, is a stunningly gorgeous picture book. The framing story is of a little girl in India. One night in the blackout ,Maya cannot sleep. She remembers her father, who has died. To … Continue reading

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The Nameless City

The Nameless City is the first in a middle- grade (approximately 8-12) graphic novel trilogy. Set in a (nameless) far Eastern city (judging by character’s names and appearances), the story of  Kai, a General’s son and one of the ruling Dao and … Continue reading

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Two Naomis

Two Naomis is a sweet middle-grade story of two NYC families attempting to become one. Naomi Marie is black, has a younger sister (Brianna) and good relationships with her divorced parents: school librarian mother and a dad who lives close by. … Continue reading

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Ghost

Ghost by Jason Reynolds is that rare thing, a perfectly pitched middle-grade contemporary written in a voice that will draw the dedicated reader and refusenik alike. Castle Crenshaw has never done athletics (why not? Don’t all kids undergo this torture in the US?) … Continue reading

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March

I thought reading March Book One and Two would be necessary, educational, instructive–not necessarily pleasurable. I was wrong. Congressman John Lewis’s journey from farm boy to theology student to activist encompassing diner sit-ins , the March on Washington and the freedom rides is … Continue reading

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